The Sky Bleeds (2028)

IART  Ingrid Katrine Amundsen /

The Sky Bleeds

The Art of Undressing Edvard Munch's Powerful Spirit: A Scream from a Brouding Mindset in the Aftermaths of the Age of Reason (2028)


By Ingrid Katrine Amundsen




KEYWORDS: EDVARD MUNCH • SCREAM • SOUL TRACING


By taking on the challenge to undress Edvard Munch's powerful spirit, the author has to adress key psychological terms, to make a full account of the intense psychological experiences and expressions, that shaped his works of art. The aim is, thereby, to undress Edvard Munch's spirit, not just as an artist, but also as a human being to the fullest sense.




Work in progress...




PRELUDE




ABSTRACT


Edvard Munch was an uncompromising and independent artist and an icon of Symbolism and Expressionism, that has given us key works of art, within these two movements. After being confronted with personal turmoil and unease, as he created The Scream (1893), he was; after two summer treatments in the German Baltic Sea resort of Warnemünde, diagnosed with paranoia. He was diagnosed in the autumn of 1908, 15 years after he painted The Scream (Munch 1893). Paranoia is a circular mentall illness that can be regarded as an artistical gift or of great intellectual gain, when being canalized into artistical or academical works, and carefully adressed and confronted in the right artistical environments or in the safe surroundings of research milieus. A paranoid thought pattern is, as mentioned, typically circular and brouding in its characteristics, and may also include social anxiety and depression, as well as a profound feeling of being haunted, to the point of exhaustion and despair. The only reasonable human reaction, in experiencing a preface to this looming and fearful mental ilness is – to scream and to paint the sky blod red, such as Munch did in The Scream (1893). By commiting to write an essay on Edvard Munch, I have taken on the challenge to undress his powerful spirit. This commitment to Edvard Munch as an artist and as a human being, is conducted in Edvard Munch's spirit: because while Edvard Munch's artworks were 'soul paintings' I continue in his spirit, to make a 'soul tracing' analysis of Munch's work of art, and Edvard Munch as a human being; fragile and disturbing, yet genial. In order to make a full account of Munch's work of art, the author seeks to make a system analysis of Edvard Munch's era, not just artistically, but also to put his work of art into a societal, institutional and historical context. This will place Edvard Munch's The Scream (1893) in a playful contrast between the most naked, intimate and personal, intense feelings, into a greater system of analysis, of the era of his professional career as an artist. A case discussion and a system analysis is, therefore, emphasised to gain a more profound understanding of who Edvard Munch was as a human being and artist, and what institutional, historical and societal forces, he was up against. 



THEORY

A Brief History of Edvard Munch's Peak Life Experiences


The State of Being Haunted: Angst and Depression, Despair, Fear and Insanity



What shaped the Intensity of Edvard Munch's Art?



Catharsis and the State of Expressing Intense Psychological Experiences



DISCUSSION

A System Analysis of in the Aftermaths of the Age of Reason


Edvard Munch's 'Soul Painting' as a Counteract to Reason: A Scream!


A single Case Discussion: When the Sky Bleeds Edvard Munch and The Scream (1893)


The Expressionism and the Symbolism in Munch's Art



CONCLUSION

What Mental Turmoil did it take for Edvard Munch to paint the Sky Blod Red and scream?


Edvard Munch's paintings shook our souls and struck our heart roots. He was not just a soul in dispair and made out of fear, he was also the embodiment of grandiose and powerful visualizations, that shook an era, and turned our minds to the most intimate, personal, naked and intense psychological experiences, of what it is like to be a human being in the fullest sense, at that time, till our present time, and most certainly beyond our existence. Edvard Munch's spirit is still alive and radiating with intense feelings, and reminds us of what is close, personal and intimate, and what is not, through his Expressionism and Symbolism. He is a survivor. His works of art will continue to breathe and flicker, and puzzle our emotions and mental states. His peak life experiences created a landscape of radiating emotions and expressions that pierce through our minds. From the darkness of his peak life experiences he, turned troubles and disturbing events into the most cut to the core art. This brings us to the next section of this brief essay: can insanity be regarded as a gift within the fields of the arts?



EPILOGUE

Art and Insanity: Insanity as a Gift within the fields of the Arts



POSTLUDE



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Note: the author of this brief essay is not an educated psychologist. Do not hesitate to confere with professionals if you have uncertainties or questions related to the psychological terms adressed in this brief essay, and do not hesitate to confess to professionals, after having read this brief essay, if you find it disturbing; emotionally or mentally. If it disturbs you, do not hesitate to find someone to talk about it; whether they are professionals, or close family and friends. Help is always within reach. My advice is to share your personal confessions to someone close to you. And again, do not hesitate to seek help if needed!


REFERENCES

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